The Shortlist for the new biennial Eugenie Summerfield Children's Book prize, for children’s authors resident in Gloucestershire, Somerset or Wiltshire, has been announced.

The overall winner will be announced at a special tea party on Sunday 15th July 2018, 3 to 5pm, at The Suffolk Anthology, Cheltenham’s independent bookshop.

For those wishing to attend, as space is strictly limited please contact : info@theanthology.co.uk

The judges, Jane Bailey, Caroline Sanderson, Angela Summerfield, Caroline Summerfield , all of whom are well-known writers in their respective fields, were so delighted by the very high standard of submissions received that they have decided to extend the number of shortlisted writers from five to six.

These are:

Stunt Double by Tamsin Cooke

Stinkbomb & Ketchup-Face and the Great Big Story Nickers by John Dougherty

How Not to Be Weird by Dawn McNiff

The Wolf Who Cried Boy! by James O’Neill

Bird Girl by Maudie Smith

A Jar of Pickles and a Pinch of Justice by Chitra Soundar.

The Eugenie Summerfield Children’s Book Prize was established in memory of the children’s author Eugenie Summerfield, who passed away in 2016. Eugenie was born at the family home in Great Pulteney Street, Bath. She is popularly remembered as the author of the Wriggly Worm Stories broadcasted on BBC Radio Four’s ‘Listen with Mother’ and its subsequent programming as ‘Listening Corner’ and ‘Let’s Join’, for which she wrote over 100 stories, from 1972-1991. Her full-length pantomime play, Wriggly Worm and the Beanstalk was described by BBC Radio 4’s ‘Pick of the Week’ as the most original pantomime to be broadcast. Eugenie also wrote 22 children’s books, whose publishers included Puffin, Ward Lock, Hutchinson, Nelson, Kingfisher, Orchard Books, Viking Kestrel and Arnold Wheaton. Eugenie’s other colourful characters included Green Grobblop, the Thogs, Dragonnella, and Tantrum the Terrible. The anthology of her short stories, ‘Sweet Dreams: The Bedtime Book’ sold 30,000 copies in the USA. Eugenie’s stories, such as ‘Cats of Meers’ and ‘The Runaway Piano,’ (available on Youtube) inspired by the rugged charm of North Yorkshire and its fishing town, Whitby, were also broadcast from 1975-76, as part of (ITV) Yorkshire Television’s ‘My World’, with specially commissioned illustrations. In 2012 her last children’s book, Foxes Forever was published, and Eugenie was invited to take part in the National Libraries Day at Gloucester Cathedral. She also published one novel for adults, Onwards and Upwards which was described by The Lady as “a quintessentially English comedy”; at the time of her death, she was writing a sequel.