The shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2017 has been announced. This year’s shortlist include one previous winner and one debut novelist.


Let’s take a look at the shortlist…

stay with meStay With Me by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀. A story of the complexities and intricacies of  married love, of family and its undoing and of motherhood set against the fraught and turbulent political landscape of Nigeria in the 1980s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the powerThe Power by Naomi Alderman. Set in the near-future this novel presents the reader with a world in which the power is in the hands of women. Teenage girls suddenly find they have the power to inflict pain and death with their fingertips…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the dark circleThe Dark Circle by Linda Grant. The Second World War has ended and a new post-war decade is beginning. For the siblings at the heart of this novel, life has been suspended – they have both been diagnosed with tuberculosis . Sent away to a sanitarium far from the city, they find themselves in the company of an interesting cast of fellow patients and what follows is a thought provoking look at Britain in the ‘age of austerity’ – a period of great change for the country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sport of kingsThe Sport of Kings by C. E. Morgan. This novel is an unflinching look at the shadows cast by the enduring legacy of slavery in America. A tale of wealth, race and rage in a country marked by its past.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First loveFirst Love by Gwendoline Riley. This is a novel which tells the story of Neve and her marriage – a marriage which is marked by scars of past and present battles. The reader is drawn into a story of relationships which raises questions about what it means to love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

do not say we have nothingDo Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thein. A young woman has fled China in the aftermath of the Tiananmen Square protests and finds refuge with ten year old Marie and her mother. A novel concerned with one of the most significant political regimes of the 20th-century, it explores the power of revolution to impact upon personal and national identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We wish all the shortlistees luck and we certainly know what we’ll be adding to our Spring reading lists. Heading to the nearest book shop now…